Years ago, I stated that I agree with those who predicted that at some point in the near future, technology will get to the point where there will, quite literally, be no such thing as privacy… at least not as we understand the term today.

We’re not there yet, but we get much closer every year. Recently, the news broke that Wikileaks released “Vault 7,” (source1, source2, source3) which is mostly CIA data that shows several things:

1. The CIA can listen to you in your home if you use certain brands/models of TV’s, even if you’re convinced the TV is turned off.

2. The CIA, NSA, and other big government organizations have already “extensively hacked” the iOS (Apple iPhone) and Android operating systems, allowing them to easily bypass the security on these systems and look into your phone, using “weaponized exploits” that the CIA has not informed Apple or Google about.

3. The CIA already has access to your private texts if you use apps like Signal, Telegram and WhatsApp, and does so without even having to break their encryption.

4. The CIA has “studied,” and likely already knows how to hack into and take control of your car. WikiLeaks alleged that this could be used to conduct “nearly undetectable assassinations.”

The CIA’s response? Their former boss blamed Millennials.

You can’t make the stuff up.

Remember, all of this is on top of Idiot Bush’s illegal wiretapping and Pussy Barack’s collecting your email, private social media info, and text metadata without a warrant. Expect Authoritarian Trump to take these unconstitutional crimes to the next level during his time as president. He’s going to be worse than Obama on this, which is saying something.

To be fair, none of this should surprise anyone. To quote one of the articles,

“The idea that the CIA and NSA can hack into devices is kind of old news,” said Johns Hopkins cryptography expert Matthew D. Green. “Anyone who thought they couldn’t was living in a fantasy world.”

Exactly.

You should never expect any semblance of real privacy in any of your online or phone communications. I certainly don’t. Unless you’re paranoid and regularly using an array of counter-surveillance tools like VPN’s, encrypted email, cryptocurrencies, and things like that, you should expect that a government employee is at least collecting some or all of your texts, emails, phone calls, voicemails, social media data, and other communications into an NSA server somewhere (most likely here) for later recall, which they will use against you if the government ever has a reason to go after you.

This applies even if you’re not an American and/or don’t live in the US. The CIA has hacked Whatsapp, which is extremely popular in Europe. Our government tapped Angela Merkel’s phone. On and on. You have no online privacy, at all.

I stopped expecting privacy in my day-to-day communications a very long time ago. As an Alpha Male 2.0, this is fine, since unlike those beta males who compulsively jerk off to porn, or those Alpha Male 1.0’s who cheat on their girlfriends or wives, I don’t hide anything in terms of my day-to-day life, including my sex life. If the government ever went through my texts or emails, it would be nothing anyone who has read my blogs over the last few years wouldn’t already know.

The only exception to this expectation of privacy, at least in my opinion, is personal legal and financial data. I think that needs to be kept private for a variety of reasons, and I do indeed take the time to use counter-surveillance measures on the rare occasions when I need to transmit key financial information over the internet. It’s a pain in the ass, and I try not to do it very often, but I do it when necessary.

However, at some point in the future, even this data will not be private. In a few decades (or less!) everyone will know everything about everyone. Details about your sex life, your history, how much money you make and how you make it; everyone will know these things, and you’ll know these things about everyone else. Children born in future generations will wonder at this strange thing called “privacy” their grandparents used to have.

My suggestion is to assume an Alpha 2. 0 lifestyle, or close to it, to render privacy as much of a nonissue as possible, so that you’re prepared for this world for when it arrives.

Because trust me, it’s coming to your life very soon.

10 Comments on “You Can’t Expect Privacy Anymore

  1. Good article, although I didnt realize even Signal had a backdoor…geez.

    A good book by author David Brin got my attention a while back to this issue: (http://amzn.to/2mFplih)
    The Transparent Societ.

    Now there is a collection of fiction edited by Brin that highlight some of the implications of this that are less than a decade away: (http://amzn.to/2mIIII4) Chasing Shadows.

  2. I’ve always made jokes about the CIA watching us do ‘secret’ things we don’t want the others to know about. Seems it’s no joke anymore. My only comfort was that I’m so unimportant who would want to spy on me but looks like we’ll all have a ‘file’ just in case. Yikes.

  3. > Expect Authoritarian Trump to take these unconstitutional crimes to the next level

    What has Trump done so far that is authoritarian? Aside from suggesting that the USA should enforce the existing citizenship laws and not permit enemies of western civilisation to enter the country?

  4. What has Trump done so far that is authoritarian?

    – Unilaterally enact more executive orders in his first few weeks than any other president in history.

    – Ban legal residents from returning to their home country after traveling abroad, as I talked about here.

    – Enabling the Department of Homeland Security to operate more thoroughly within the US (source)

    Those are just off the top of my head; there are more.

    There are lots of things he’s done that I really like too, but that doesn’t make him not an authoritarian.

  5. “I’ve always made jokes about the CIA watching us do ‘secret’ things we don’t want the others to know about. Seems it’s no joke anymore.”

    I for one have been saying it since my high school years (20 or so years ago) and it literally made me an outcast. And now guess what everyone’s talking about it.

    The silver lining in this is that its gonna lead to a realization that most things aren’t as demonized as they usually are, just really annoying. Drugs are the main argument of this, I predict that because there is no privacy, the drug war will end, among other things.

  6. @Joelsuf lol yeah I was pretty much labelled a weirdo to and was every ready to done my tinfoil cap. This kinda of technology would stress the hypocrites to distraction. A wonderful saying is my country for hypocrites is ‘knuip die kat in die donker’ (to pull the cats tail in the dark) and to those I would also say ‘kry vir julle’ (y’all gonna get what’s coming) Fun times ahead.

  7. BD – you think this is why they invented Kindle? So they can hack into our books too?

  8. BD – you think this is why they invented Kindle? So they can hack into our books too?

    No, I think they did that in order to own and control our books, Apple style, not to hack them.

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